Ways To Decide When To File Individual Bankrupcy

Filing personal bankruptcy is not like it used to be. It used to be reserved for low income families that just could not make payments on their lines of credit. These days, people of all income levels are filing for personal bankruptcy. Read through the advice that follows to learn if your situation requires you to take the big leap to file for bankruptcy.

A huge mistake people make before filing for bankruptcy is maxing out their credit cards. This can lead to disaster when you file and the credit card companies might not discharge the debt. If Keep Reading can, you need to stop using your credit cards at least six months before you file, and ideally for a year prior. Also, do your best to pay the minimum payments on these cards for at least six months before you file.


In any personal bankruptcy filing, it is essential to make certain to list all elements of your financial life in your petition and other paperwork. Failing to include all income sources or omitting individual debts and accounts can lead to substantial problems down the road that can limit the dischargeability of some of your most substantial obligations.

Remember you still have to pay taxes on your debts. A lot of people don't realize that even if their debts are discharged in the bankruptcy, they are still responsible to the IRS. The IRS usually does not allow complete forgiveness, although payment plans are common. Make sure to find out what is covered and what is not.



Be safe and hire an attorney for help. There are many websites these days that claim to walk you through the process of filing bankruptcy on your own. It is cheaper than using an attorney to get you through this time, but it leaves a lot of room for error. This is not something that you want to take chances on.

Include all financial information when filing for bankruptcy. Things that may not seem significant to you may be very important. Include all assets like: vehicles, every cent of income, retirement account, stocks and anything else that has value. Furthermore, include any lawsuits that are pending against you or other parties.

Consider filing Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7, if you are facing foreclosure. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to create a restructured payment plan which includes your mortgage arrears. This will allow you to get your mortgage payments current, so that you won't lose your home. Chapter 13 doesn't require you to turn over property, so you don't have to worry about the homestead exemption, either.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from "bankrupt" to "debtor" so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

Talk to a credit counselor before deciding to file for bankruptcy. You have to attend an approved credit counseling session anyway in order to file, and a qualified counselor can help you evaluate your options and determine whether bankruptcy is in your best interest. Ask your credit counselor any questions you may have about what type of bankruptcy to file or its effects on your credit.

One way that many people have been able to avoid personal bankruptcy is to consolidate debt. Often, people have accumulated many small debts that can be extremely difficult to pay at the same time. If you can consolidate these debts along with larger ones into one debt, it is much easier to avoid bankruptcy.

Before filing for bankruptcy, keep in mind that child support will not be discharged in a bankruptcy case. The reason for this is that child support is a responsibility that a parent must pay. Bankruptcy does not remove that responsibility. Be sure to include any child support in your list of debts that will remain with you after the bankruptcy is discharged.

Look into Chapter 12 bankruptcy if you are a family farmer. The purpose of this chapter is to reorganize the farming business so that it can remain operative. Chapter 12 bankruptcy can be filed by single-owner farms or partnerships. Be aware that there is a ceiling on the amount of debt for these filings.

Be aware that bankruptcy does not actually cover all types of debt. Debts that you owe to the government (both federal and local) will still need to be repaid. Some people try to dodge this by financing their tax bills through credit cards or loans. This does not work; you will not be able to discharge those debts via bankruptcy.

Bankruptcy is something that is set up to help you. Do not think that simply click the following web site is over because of bankruptcy. There will be some limitations to things that you can do, however, they are only temporary. There are also organizations out there that can help you get your life back in order after bankruptcy. If you filed or are thinking of filing, you should look into these organizations. There is hope.

Never rely upon bill collectors to share accurate information about your debt and bankruptcy. Some unethical collectors tell consumers that their debts are exempt from bankruptcy rules, but this is actually only true for a few special kinds of debt. If a collection agency provides you with inaccurate information like this, report them to the Attorney General's Office in your state.

Don't let bill collectors mislead you. When you discuss bankruptcy with some bill collectors, they may tell you that bankruptcy will not affect them, and you will still have to pay them. They are not being honest, all of your bills can be covered depending on the bankruptcy option that you fiel.

Always be honest in reporting all income, assets and debts when filing bankruptcy. If you hide any financial information, whether it is intentional or accidental, you run the risk of being barred from filing bankruptcy on those debts listed in your original bankruptcy petition in the future, which means you will have no relief from your financial burdens.

As you can probably see, personal bankruptcy is not a magic pill that makes all of your debts just vanish. However, in certain situations, it is a viable option. Managing your finances takes discipline and a certain amount of financial knowledge. Hopefully, this article has shed some light on personal bankruptcy, and whether it makes sense for you.

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